Sunday, August 7, 2016

The Egyptian Book of The Dead - Ebook And Useful Educational Links

This detail scene, from the Papyrus of Hunefer (c. 1275 BCE), shows the scribe Hunefer's heart being weighed on the scale of Maat against the feather of truth, by the jackal-headed Anubis. The ibis-headed Thoth, scribe of the gods, records the result. If his heart equals exactly the weight of the feather, Hunefer is allowed to pass into the afterlife. If not, he is eaten by the waiting chimeric devouring creature Ammit composed of the deadly crocodile, lion, and hippopotamus. Vignettes such as these were a common illustration in Egyptian books of the dead.

From Wikipedia: The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE.[1] The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw[2] is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.[3] Another translation would be Book of emerging forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts[4] consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.

EGYPTIAN BOOK OF THE DEAD (EBOOK)

Egyptian Book of The Dead -- Bookyards
The Book of the Dead -- Sacred Texts
The Egyptian Book of the Dead -- Translated by E.A. Wallis Budge, The Nazarene Way of Essenic Studies

USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS

 Egyptian Book of the Dead -- Ancient History
Teacher's Resource - Book of the Dead -- British Museum
Book of the Dead -- Encyclopædia Britannica
Bookof the Dead -- Crystal Links
What is a Book of the Dead? -- John Taylor, British Museum
The Book of the Dead -- Ancient Egypt Online

USEFUL QUOTES

Book of the Dead -- Wikiquote

VIDEOS ON THE EGYPTIAN BOOK OF THE DEAD



Editor's Note: As a Sopranos fan, I found this interesting .... James Gandolfini 'read Egyptian Book of the Dead' hours before dying from massive heart attack (Daily Mail).

Saturday, March 5, 2016

Ebooks By Homer: The Illiad And The Odyssey

Idealized portrayal of Homer dating to the Hellenistic period. British Museum. Wikipedia 

From Wikipedia: Homer (Ancient Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is best known as the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey. He was believed by the ancient Greeks to have been the first and greatest of the epic poets. Author of the first known literature of Europe, he is central to the Western canon.

EBOOKS BY HOMER 

Works By Homer -- Bookyards The Iliad (By Homer) -- Bookyards
Works by Homer -- Classics.mit
Books by Homer -- Project Gutenberg
The Odyssey -- Literature Network
The Illiad -- Classical.mit
The Iliad by Homer -- Full Audiobook
THE ODYSSEY by Homer - FULL AudioBook

 USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS ON HOMER 

Homer -- Wikipedia
Homer: Greek poet -- Encyclopaedia Britannica
Homer Biography -- Biography
Homer Quotes -- Brainy Quote
The Odyssey at a Glance -- Cliff Notes
The Odyssey -- Classical Literature
The Odyssey Summary -- eNotes
THE ODYSSEY -- Spark Notes
Odyssey -- Wikipedia
About the Iliad -- Cliffs Notes
The Illiad -- Sparks Notes
The Illiad -- Classical Literature
Illiad -- Wikipdia

 VIDEOS ON HOMER AND HIS WORKS 

Classics Summarized: The Odyssey
Video SparkNotes: Homer's The Odyssey summary
Homer: The Iliad
Classics Summarized: The Iliad

The Legend of Gilgamesh

This is a newly discovered partially broken tablet V of the Epic of Gilgamesh. The tablet dates back to the old Babylonian period, 2003-1595 BCE. From Mesopotamia, Iraq. The Sulaymaniyah Museum, Iraq. Wikipedia 

From Wikipedia: The Epic of Gilgamesh is an epic poem from ancient Mesopotamia. Dating from the Third Dynasty of Ur (circa 2100 BC), it is often regarded as the earliest surviving great work of literature. The literary history of Gilgamesh begins with five Sumerian poems about 'Bilgamesh' (Sumerian for 'Gilgamesh'), king of Uruk. These independent stories were later used as source material for a combined epic. The first surviving version of this combined epic, known as the "Old Babylonian" version, dates to the 18th century BC and is titled after its incipit, Shūtur eli sharrī ("Surpassing All Other Kings"). Only a few tablets of it have survived. The later "Standard" version dates from the 13th to the 10th centuries BC and bears the incipit Sha naqba īmuru ("He who Saw the Deep", in modern terms: "He who Sees the Unknown"). Approximately two thirds of this longer, twelve-tablet version have been recovered. Some of the best copies were discovered in the library ruins of the 7th-century BC Assyrian king Ashurbanipal.

 THE LEGEND OF GILGAMESH (EBOOK) 

The Epic of Gilgamesh -- Academia
The Epic of Gilgamesh (Translated by N.K. Sandars) -- HDHS
The Epic Of Gilgamesh (A New Translation) -- Penguin

 USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS 

The Legend of Gilgamesh -- Classical Literature
The Epic of Gilgamesh (Plot Overview) -- The Spark Notes
The Epic of Gilgamesh -- The Spark Notes
The Epic of Gilgamesh Summary -- Enotes
The Babylonian Story of the Deluge and the Epic of Gilgamish -- E.A. Wallis Budge, Sacred Texts The Gilgamesh Epic -- Cummings Study Guide
Gilgamesh -- Ancient History Encyclopedia Gilgamesh -- Wikipedia
Epic of Gilgamesh -- Wikipedia

 VIDEOS ON THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH 

The Epic of Gilgamesh Lecture -- WatchKnowLearn
Epic of Gilgamesh -- YouTube