Monday, August 29, 2016

Aeschylus: Ebooks And Useful Links

Bust of Aeschylus from the Capitoline Museums, Rome. Wikipedia

From Wikipedia: Aeschylus (c. 525/524 – c. 456/455 BC) was an ancient Greek tragedian. His plays, alongside those of Sophocles and Euripides, are the only works of Classical Greek literature to have survived. He is often described as the father of tragedy: critics' and scholars' knowledge of the genre begins with his work, and understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in theater to allow conflict among them, whereas characters previously had interacted only with the chorus.

Only seven of his estimated seventy to ninety plays have survived, and there is a longstanding debate regarding his authorship of one of these plays, Prometheus Bound, which some believe his son Euphorion actually wrote. Fragments of some other plays have survived in quotes and more continue to be discovered on Egyptian papyrus, often giving us surprising insights into his work.[6] He was probably the first dramatist to present plays as a trilogy; his Oresteia is the only ancient example of the form to have survived.[7] At least one of his plays was influenced by the Persians' second invasion of Greece (480–479 BC). This work, The Persians, is the only surviving classical Greek tragedy concerned with contemporary events (very few of that kind were ever written),[8] and a useful source of information about its period. The significance of war in Ancient Greek culture was so great that Aeschylus' epitaph commemorates his participation in the Greek victory at Marathon while making no mention of his success as a playwright. Despite this, Aeschylus' work – particularly the Oresteia – is acclaimed by today's literary academics.

Read more ....

EBOOKS BY AESCHYLUS

Works by Aeschylus -- Bookyards
Works by Aeschylus -- Internet Classics Archive
The Dramas of Aeschylus -- Internet Sacred Text Archive
Poems by Aeschylus -- Poetry Archive

USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS

Aeschylus -- Encyclopaedia Britannica
Aeschylus -- Columbia College
Aeschylus -- Theatre Database
Aeschylus and his Tragedies -- Theatre History
Aeschylus -- New World Encycpodia
Aeschylus -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
Aeschylus -- Encyclopedia.com
Aeschylis -- Classical Literature
Aeschylus -- Crystal Links
Aeschylus and his tragedies -- Theatre History

USEFUL QUOTES

Aeschylus Quotes -- Brainy Quote
Aeschylus -- Wikiquote
Aeschylus Quotes -- Literary Quotations
Aeschylus Quotes -- Notable Quotes

VIDEOS ON AESCHYLUS









Sunday, August 7, 2016

The Egyptian Book of The Dead - Ebook And Useful Educational Links

This detail scene, from the Papyrus of Hunefer (c. 1275 BCE), shows the scribe Hunefer's heart being weighed on the scale of Maat against the feather of truth, by the jackal-headed Anubis. The ibis-headed Thoth, scribe of the gods, records the result. If his heart equals exactly the weight of the feather, Hunefer is allowed to pass into the afterlife. If not, he is eaten by the waiting chimeric devouring creature Ammit composed of the deadly crocodile, lion, and hippopotamus. Vignettes such as these were a common illustration in Egyptian books of the dead.

From Wikipedia: The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE.[1] The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw[2] is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.[3] Another translation would be Book of emerging forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts[4] consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.

EGYPTIAN BOOK OF THE DEAD (EBOOK)

Egyptian Book of The Dead -- Bookyards
The Book of the Dead -- Sacred Texts
The Egyptian Book of the Dead -- Translated by E.A. Wallis Budge, The Nazarene Way of Essenic Studies

USEFUL EDUCATIONAL LINKS

 Egyptian Book of the Dead -- Ancient History
Teacher's Resource - Book of the Dead -- British Museum
Book of the Dead -- Encyclopædia Britannica
Bookof the Dead -- Crystal Links
What is a Book of the Dead? -- John Taylor, British Museum
The Book of the Dead -- Ancient Egypt Online

USEFUL QUOTES

Book of the Dead -- Wikiquote

VIDEOS ON THE EGYPTIAN BOOK OF THE DEAD



Editor's Note: As a Sopranos fan, I found this interesting .... James Gandolfini 'read Egyptian Book of the Dead' hours before dying from massive heart attack (Daily Mail).